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Domenico Starnone

Domenico Starnone

Domenico Starnone was born in Naples and lives in Rome. He is the author of thirteen works of fiction, including First Execution (Europa, 2009), Via Gemito, winner of Italy’s most prestigious literary prize, the Strega, and Ties (Europa, 2017), a New York Times Editors’ Pick, and The Sunday Times’ best novel in translation of 2017.

All Domenico Starnone's books

Upcoming events

London
March 23, 07:00pm
Introducing their latest books, chaired by Claire Armitstead, Books Editor, The Guardian and The Observer.
Europa Editions congratulates authors Domenico Starnone and Négar Djavadi, and translators Jhumpa Lahiri and Tina Kover!
Négar Djavadi and Domenico Starnone make the shortlist for National Book Awards in Translated Literature

Latest reviews

  • Domenico Starnone pairs together two opposites in this suspenseful novella, when a disillusioned grandfather reluctantly leaves the comfort of his home to take care of his precocious grandson. The old man, an illustrator, is too preoccupied with a deadline from his editor to...
    — Electric Lit, Jun 24 2019
  • (...) Just how difficult Neapolitan can be, even to someone steeped in Italian, became clear to the author Jhumpa Lahiri when she took on two novels by another of the southern Italian city’s writers, Domenico Starnone. Lahiri moved from the US to Rome and dedicated herself...
    — The Guardian, Apr 8 2019
  • “When I was twelve, other people thought I was a prodigy who dazzled and disturbed… by the time I was twenty, I’d learned to deride the facility of my hands as if it were a weakness.” Daniele Mallarico, who speaks these words, is a renegade Neapolitan, an old man on the...
    — Bookanista, Jul 18 2018
  • omenico Starnone’s fourteenth novel Trick is a case of The Turn of the Screw- driver: the plot hinges on whether one can be found and our narrator, Daniele Mallar- ico, released from an unsettling trap. But it is a different ghostly tale by Henry James – “The Jolly Corner”...
    — The Times, Apr 23 2018
  • An old man’s breakfasts and bath times with a wired-up four-year-old, his wrestling for the remote, desperately trying to find some space for himself and his work. Starnone, one of Italy’s most accomplished novelists, knows the territory and delivers it wonderfully.
    — The Guardian, Apr 19 2018
  • Daniele Mallarico, in his seventies, is on his way from Milan to Naples, where he has agreed to care for his four-year-old grandson Mario for three days so that his daughter and son-in-law can attend a professional mathematics conference. Daniele, already late with illustrations...
    — Seeing the world through books, Mar 13 2018
  • Starnone expertly plucks some of the short story’s essence, twisting and molding his own work into a marvel of metafiction that feels fresh and surprising.
    — The Washington Post, Mar 13 2018
  • Jhumpa Lahiri may have made a name for herself with award-winning fiction like Interpreter of Maladies and The Namesake, but lately, the author has been finding new creative fulfillment in an adjacent practice: translation. Over the past few years, Lahiri has immersed...
    — Entertainment Weekly, Mar 12 2018
  • Scherzetto, the book’s Italian title, means “a minor work or composition.” But there is nothing minor about this novel apart from Mario, who is indeed quite small. Trick is not a story for children, nor is it a novel for those in need of reassurance. Here is the fine print...
    — Electric Lit, Mar 7 2018
  • In his playful new novel, translated from the Italian by Jhumpa Lahiri, Strega prize winner Starnone pits Daniele, a cranky 75-year-old artist, against his obstinate four-year-old grandson in a three-day battle of wills. Daniele, still convalescing from surgery, is babysitter...
    — BBC Culture, Mar 1 2018
  • Domenico Starnone’s new novel Trick has all the coherence and intensity of a classic two-hand play. An older man and his grandson of four square off in an apartment in Naples, matching barbs and power plays over the course of a baby-sitting trip set up so the child’s parents...
    — Lit Hub, Mar 1 2018
  • A grandfather has to look after his four-year-old grandson for a few days — with hilarious consequences! So the sell-line for the YouTube version of Domenico Starnone’s Trick (trans Jhumpa Lahiri, Europa, £11.99) might run: small child hurling granddad’s paints and pencils...
    — The Sunday Times, Feb 25 2018
  • Starnone’s astute and emotionally precise novel (after Ties) follows famed illustrator Daniele Mallarico as he returns to his childhood home in Naples at the request of his daughter, Betta. Daniele is reluctantly tasked with watching his four-year-old grandson, Mario, while...
    — Publishers Weekly, Feb 6 2018
  • Starnone’s latest novel describes a man’s visit with his grandson. A new book from Starnone (Ties, 2017, etc.) is an event to celebrate. An exquisite Italian writer believed to be Elena Ferrante’s husband, he writes slim, elegant, meticulously crafted novels—and...
    — Kirkus Review, Jan 25 2018
  • Domenico’s Ties was one of my favourite books of 2017 so it’s safe to say I was eagerly anticipating his next. In Trick, a successful illustrator and his 4 year old grandson are shut inside an apartment in Naples. A sharp observation of two unlikely rivals matching wits and...
    — Bookriot, Jan 9 2018
  • Daniela Petracco Director, Europa Editions The book that made my year: Ties by Domenico Starnone is a powerful short novel about relationships, family, love and the ineluctable consequences of our actions. Lucidly rendered into English by Jhumpa Lahiri, it was selected...
    — The Guardian, Dec 29 2017
  • Domenico Starnone’s Ties (Europa £9.99)is a 144-page novel punching three times that weight. From three viewpoints, it dissects a marriage that has survived more than 50 years, despite infidelities. An outstanding achievement from the writer once suspected of being Elena Ferrante...
    — The Sunday Times, Nov 27 2017
  • Ties by Domenico Starnone among 100 Notable Books of 2017 for the New York Times.
    — The New York Times, Nov 23 2017
  • "A slim, stunning meditation on marriage, fidelity, honesty, and truth."
    — Kirkus Reviews, Nov 14 2017

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