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Elena Ferrante

Elena Ferrante

Elena Ferrante is the author of The Days of Abandonment (Europa, 2005), which was made into a film directed by Roberto Faenza, Troubling Love (Europa, 2006), adapted by Mario Martone, and The Lost Daughter (Europa, 2008), soon to be a film directed by Maggie Gyllenhaal. She is also the author of Frantumaglia: A Writer’s Journey (Europa, 2016) in which she recounts her experience as a novelist, and a children’s picture book illustrated by Mara Cerri, The Beach at Night (Europa, 2016). The four volumes known as the “Neapolitan quartet” (My Brilliant Friend, The Story of a New Name, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, and The Story of the Lost Child) were published in America by Europa between 2012 and 2015. The first season of the HBO series My Brilliant Friend, directed by Saverio Costanzo, premiered in 2018.

All Elena Ferrante's books

Upcoming events

Elena Ferrante is one of TIME's 100 Most Influential People of the year.
Author of bestselling Neapolitan novels says she was keen to test herself with the ‘bold, anxious exercise’ of writing regular pieces for the magazine
November 5
The much-awaited series based on Elena Ferrante’s masterpiece is set to hit our screens—and the whole world’s!—on 19th November 2018. It will be broadcast in the UK on Sky Atlantic.
A selection of images of Europa's events at FILL 2018 - Festival of Italian Literature in London.

Latest reviews

  • The television adaptation Elena Ferrante’s My Brilliant Friend is a reminder of Italy’s strong tradition in the coming-of-age genre, from Life Is Beautiful to Cinema Paradiso
    — The Guardian, Nov 19 2018
  • As the international bestseller comes to Sky Atlantic, Tom Kington meets the cast on set in Italy
    — The Times, Nov 15 2018
  • HBO’s gorgeous limited series based on Italian author Elena Ferrante’s acclaimed book follows a passionate and challenging friendship to searing effect
    — Rolling Stone, Nov 15 2018
  • The reclusive author’s Neapolitan novels have been devoured by millions. Now the first one is about to hit TV screens in an ambitious adaptation made on location in Naples
    — The Observer, Nov 11 2018
  • What's The Plot Of My Brilliant Friend? Based on the first of Elena Ferrante's celebrated, best-selling Neapolitan Novels, the eight-episode series of the same name is set in '50s Naples and follows the complicated friendship and lives of two girls, Elena (who narrates)
    — Vogue UK, Nov 11 2018
  • Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan novels may be the most critically acclaimed and beloved literary series of the last decade. The four-part series—My Brilliant Friend, The Story of a New Name, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, and The Story of the Lost Child—follow two women...
    — Esquire, Aug 30 2018
  • The book I wish I’d written I aborted a third novel, and it’s interesting (for about five seconds) to imagine what I would have produced had I soldiered on through to the end of it. I might have liked to do groundbreaking work such as Haruki Murakami’s Wind-Up Bird...
    — The Guardian, Sep 26 2017
  • The wonderful thing about being a reader is that even when you’re familiar with the classics of English literature, there are still bookshelves all over the world to explore. These writers, featured in Radio 4’s Reading Europe series, are some of the most famous novelists...
    — BBC Radio 4, Sep 11 2017
  • Mother and housewife Olga, 38, is left by her husband Mario, 40, for a girl they have both known since she was fifteen. Olga and Mario have two children and a dog, and live in a flat in a tower block in Turin. This is a story of a midlife crisis; of Mario who questions his male...
    — Contemporary Psychotherapy, Aug 2 2017
  • Her letters and interviews are decidedly not mere chatter: they are literary works. They show artistry and imagination, and Ferrante even notes the difficulty of answering interview questions because they lead her into a complicated maze of storytelling, artifacts, and searching.
    — Kenyon Review, Jul 25 2017
  • Italy Devotees of Elena Ferrante, author of the bestselling novels of female friendship in post-war Naples, have readily accepted her argument that she writes under a pseudonym because it’s essential to her work. They were outraged when a journalist claimed last autumn...
    — The Telegraph, Jul 20 2017
  • Late to the party, I read Elena Ferrante over Christmas and I’d happily read her again this summer, on the terrace of a farmhouse overlooking the foothills of the French Alps.
    — The Observer, Jul 11 2017
  • Look out for: Lila’s wedding – it’s so tense and troubling that it makes the wedding sequence in The Godfather look like it was guest directed by Richard Curtis.
    — BBC Radio 4, Jun 28 2017
  • Elena Ferrante’s novels evoke the Neapolitan city in all its drama, including the food, and inspire a charity cucina povera feast of succulent greens and juicy sausages typical of the region
    — The Guardian, Jun 22 2017
  • Where to start with this rich, dazzling, devastatingly insightful quartet of companionship — the most fluent (according to me and everyone I know who has read it) rendition of female friendship you could hope to find in literature? It begins with 66 year old Elena finding out...
    — The Debrief, Jun 12 2017
  • Elena and Lila are friends living in 1950s Italy. In their violent neighborhood, death is not a stranger. As the two friends grow and change, so does their environment. Elena reaches towards writing as an escape, while Lila’s ties to their neighborhood only become stronger.
    — Barnes & Noble, Jun 8 2017
  • Last fall’s noisy dispute around Elena Ferrante’s biographical identity ignited a wealth of contrasting yet instructive reactions. Whether troubled or newly admiring or indifferent to the apparent divergences between the empirical author’s life and that of her character...
    — Public Books, Jun 8 2017
  • Frantumaglia is an excellent accompaniment to the novels of Elena Ferrante and insight into this writer’s journey and process, in particular the inspiration behind her characters, settings and recurring themes.
    — Word by Word, Apr 14 2017
  • It’s the ever-spiraling, conflicted, ultimately extraordinary feminism in these novels that most touches me. That difficult, ultimate, affirming-of-being, but in a feminine context. I’ve just never read anything like it. I don’t think it’s ever been done. And it’s about time.
    — Aspen Institute, Apr 10 2017
  • Elena Ferrante’s four richly personal Neapolitan novels have won her legions of admirers. Eloquent about the power of memory, they’re an addictive portrait of friendship at its most intense. The central characters, Lenù and Lila, are often apart, but their destinies are...
    — Evening Standard, Mar 22 2017

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